Knitting Factory Presents

Tech N9ne: Strictly Strange 2017 Tour

Event Info:

Knitting Factory Concert House - Spokane
Spokane , WA
Friday Mar 31, 2017
Show: 8:00 PM
Doors: 7:00 PM
All Ages
$26.00

Additional Info:

All Ages
TECH N9NE
(Urban)
For an artist who has achieved so much – the most robust touring regimen in rap, more than a decade owning the most successful independent rap label, an independently released gold single, and recurring placement on Forbes’ Hip-Hop Cash Kings list, among them – Tech N9ne wanted his new album to transport him and his listeners to new levels of musical expression. With Special Effects, the Strange Music mogul has delivered. ...
For an artist who has achieved so much – the most robust touring regimen in rap, more than a decade owning the most successful independent rap label, an independently released gold single, and recurring placement on Forbes’ Hip-Hop Cash Kings list, among them – Tech N9ne wanted his new album to transport him and his listeners to new levels of musical expression. With Special Effects, the Strange Music mogul has delivered. ...
For an artist who has achieved so much – the most robust touring regimen in rap, more than a decade owning the most successful independent rap label, an independently released gold single, and recurring placement on Forbes’ Hip-Hop Cash Kings list, among them – Tech N9ne wanted his new album to transport him and his listeners to new levels of musical expression. With Special Effects, the Strange Music mogul has delivered. “We’re playing with music, letting people know that we got this,” Tech N9ne says. “What it turned into, after my mom passed June 6, 2014, we still kept the same thing of affecting the music and the beats, but it got real serious, man.” Tech N9ne gets serious in each section of Special Effects, which is broken into 10 portions (each of which has its own subdivision), starting with “Sunday Morning” and running through the entire week before concluding with another “Sunday” installment and an “Encore.” The “Wednesday” section is dedicated to lyricism and features a collaboration Tech N9ne’s been working on since 1999. Eminem appears with Tech N9ne and Krizz Kaliko on “Speedom (WWC2),” one of the best rap exercises ever recorded. Each rapper flows at breakneck speed while clearly articulating each word of their mind-blowing raps. Even though having Eminem on Special Effects may bring Tech N9ne extra attention, he didn’t secure the appearance for name recognition. “I got Eminem on the album because I love what he does and he’s on the top of his game,” Tech N9ne explains. “I always felt like I was one of those guys, too, that really took time with lyrics, that really took time to create material that people have to study.” Longtime Tech N9ne fans have been studying Tech N9ne’s story raps for years. One of his most legendary series reaches its dramatic finale with “Pyscho B**ch III.” Given that the Kansas City rapper no longer has the psycho female element in his life, he wanted to conclude the installments with a chilling ending based on a real-life experience.   “When I heard the beat, it was so massive and so eerie that I wanted to talk about a crime of passion,” Tech N9ne explains of the song, which features Hopsin. “My best friend Brian Dennis, he was killed through a crime of passion, so I know it’s about a woman dating two dudes, usually. So, I made the song with two rappers dating the same chick. She got busted with one of them and they both knew each other. They don’t like each other much and they’re fighting over this girl.” Switching gears, Tech N9ne gets serious about making music for the clubs with “Hood Go Crazy.” The song features 2 Chainz and B.o.B, and harkens back to Tech N9ne’s roots as a dancer. “I know what makes people move,” he explains. “Just like I did ‘Planet Rock 2K,’ ‘Let’s Get Fucked Up’ and a lot of the party songs I’ve done, being three-dimensional. It’s 2015 now, so what’s Tech N9ne’s ‘Caribou Lou’ going to sound like in the future? It’s ‘Hood Go Crazy.’” As much as Tech N9ne focuses on other pursuits, Special Effects is dominated by darkness, the pain and confusion that enveloped him upon the death of his mother. While he was reflecting upon her passing, he thought about the artwork of his K.O.D., Seepage and Boiling Point projects. Each featured black tar covering a portion of Tech N9ne’s body. As Tech N9ne revisited his artwork, he and producer Seven realized he was now metaphorically covered by this film. The results were “Shroud,” one of Special Effects’ most emotional songs. “It has a need to be angelic, to be good, to take all that madness and let it explode and shake the masses and put it back on the evil people,” Tech N9ne explains. “I spit out everything I felt. I was really angry with people’s evilness and was dealing with my confusion about my mom, about why she was so tormented. She was such a God-fearing person, loving person. It’s just me talking to God and really letting the darkness take over me, but still turn it on the evil. It’s all in me, but then I turn it back on them, the evil that they made.” As the album heads into its final sections, Tech explains how people have turned on him with “A Certain Comfort,” discusses losing longtime friends to disagreements on “Burn It Down” and details bringing people together on “Life Sentence.” With “Dyin’ Flyin’,” he addresses people’s claims that he’s selling out, while “Worldly Angel” sums Tech N9ne up as a human: the good and the bad, the confusion and the joy.   These are hallmarks of Tech N9ne’s work, key ingredients that have helped the Missouri mastermind grow from one of rap’s best-kept secrets into one of its most successful acts. With a tireless work ethic, he became rap’s marquee double-threat: a rapper whose musical magnificence was matched by his impeccable live show. He and partner Travis O’Guin launched Strange Music in 1999 and have methodically built it into an independent powerhouse, a label that releases high-quality, chart-topping music and whose artists, Tech N9ne chief among them, tour throughout the world virtually year-round. It all adds up to one of rap’s best success stories. But, as Tech N9ne has found, success doesn’t always shield you from loss, setbacks and jealousy. “It’s messed up that money changes everybody around you and not necessarily you,” Tech N9ne says. “I’m still me. Money changes everything. Fame changes everything and it’s a shame. That’s one thing about Special Effects. Two is that I’m totally messed up about my mom’s death because I felt like she was such an angel and she was cheated spiritually, to me, in this life, so I’m frustrated. But in the midst of all that sadness and upset and madness, I’m still going to find a way to celebrate, to say thank you to my fans. We’re going to party the pain away.” And Special Effects is the perfect elixir – for Tech N9ne and for the rest of us. 

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Brotha Lynch Hung
(Urban)
A versatile producer as well as an excellent solo rapper in his own right, Brotha Lynch Hung was born Kevin Mann in Sacramento, California. He hooked up with Master P for a 1993 EP named 24 Deep, but then went out on his own for his debut solo album, 1995's Season of da Siccness. Mann worked on production for Master P's I'm Bout It, E-40's Southwest Riders, and Mr. Serv-On's Life Insurance before turning back to his own career. Given a big push by Master P's breakout success in the middle of 1997, Brotha Lynch Hung's sophomore album, Loaded, followed in 1997. EBK4 followed in 2000 and both Blocc Movement and Virus appeared the next summer. The year 2002 was less busy, with Appearances: Book 1 being released in the spring and the Plague DVD ...
A versatile producer as well as an excellent solo rapper in his own right, Brotha Lynch Hung was born Kevin Mann in Sacramento, California. He hooked up with Master P for a 1993 EP named 24 Deep, but then went out on his own for his debut solo album, 1995's Season of da Siccness. Mann worked on production for Master P's I'm Bout It, E-40's Southwest Riders, and Mr. Serv-On's Life Insurance before turning back to his own career. Given a big push by Master P's breakout success in the middle of 1997, Brotha Lynch Hung's sophomore album, Loaded, followed in 1997. EBK4 followed in 2000 and both Blocc Movement and Virus appeared the next summer. The year 2002 was less busy, with Appearances: Book 1 being released in the spring and the Plague DVD ...
A versatile producer as well as an excellent solo rapper in his own right, Brotha Lynch Hung was born Kevin Mann in Sacramento, California. He hooked up with Master P for a 1993 EP named 24 Deep, but then went out on his own for his debut solo album, 1995's Season of da Siccness. Mann worked on production for Master P's I'm Bout It, E-40's Southwest Riders, and Mr. Serv-On's Life Insurance before turning back to his own career. Given a big push by Master P's breakout success in the middle of 1997, Brotha Lynch Hung's sophomore album, Loaded, followed in 1997. EBK4 followed in 2000 and both Blocc Movement and Virus appeared the next summer. The year 2002 was less busy, with Appearances: Book 1 being released in the spring and the Plague DVD following it that summer. His 2010 release Dinner and a Movie found him on Tech N9ne's label, Strange Music. The concept album was followed by another, Coathanga Strangla, in 2011. Both efforts focused on the life of a serial killer. ~ John Bush, Rovi

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Krizz Kaliko
(Urban)
There are two kinds of crazy in this world — crazy you stay away from and crazy that manifests itself as brilliance. Krizz Kaliko knows both ends of that extreme, whether by design or not. ...
There are two kinds of crazy in this world — crazy you stay away from and crazy that manifests itself as brilliance. Krizz Kaliko knows both ends of that extreme, whether by design or not. ...
There are two kinds of crazy in this world — crazy you stay away from and crazy that manifests itself as brilliance. Krizz Kaliko knows both ends of that extreme, whether by design or not. Born Samuel William Christopher Watson, at age two — well before becoming musical co-conspirator to Midwest rap legend Tech N9ne — he developed vitiligo, a skin disorder that causes loss of pigmentation. His eyelids and lips are splotched white and he cuts an odd figure; in a crowd or alone, he’s impossible to miss. “Growing up, kids would pick on me and kids would bully me,” he says. “They’d throw rocks at me and chase me home, because I looked different. It hurt. It changed me. Made me sad. But then, also, it made me do things to alleviate that sadness. I learned to sing. I learned to dance. I learned to rap. I was a fat little kid that didn’t look like anyone else — naturally, that became my biggest asset. Somehow, I became pretty popular.” Kaliko was reared in the racially-diverse suburbs of South Kansas City, Missouri. His mother was a singer of local renowned gospel group; father, the superintendent of a Sunday school. He first stretched his vocal cords in the choir, and, had it been up to his parents (they divorced when he was just 4-years-old), he’d have gone on to a fine career as an attorney. After two years at Penn Valley Community College he quit school. Something else was tugging at his soul. Something from his youth. “My stepfather used to whoop on me,” Krizz says, “He was fresh out of the pen, and he was a terrible dude.  He was physically abusive and crazy, institutionalized crazy. Not only was he crazy, but also a criminal. He made his bones robbing banks and committing other serious crimes. For Kaliko, step-pops is an enduring source of much psychological pain. “He terrified me” he says. “When people weren’t around and my mother wasn’t there, he’d abuse me. And nobody believed what I said. It was like I was the crazy one. I thought about killing him all the time,  I’d think about it endlessly. Visualizing it, how I’d do it, I was that mad. I would get weapons from my friends — bats, knives, or whatever it would take. I thought: I will kill him in his sleep. And then miraculously the boogie man disappeared, he and my mother split up.” Carrying his childhood scars, Kaliko spent his teens and early twenties drifting, not especially successful or unsuccessful at anything, he opted to not continue with college. He went on to hold a series of odd jobs. He was a grocery store clerk, corrections officer and even a customer service rep for VoiceStream (later to be known as T-Mobile) meanwhile, he quietly pursued music by rapping and singing, not hewing to any conventional standard for what it should sound like. “I was just a fan,” he says. “And that allowed me to go in many different directions. I could identify with country songs, gospel songs, Christian rock songs, songs that were meant for dancing, commercial songs, non-commercial songs. I was and still am, a liberal thinker. I enjoyed everything, and through music I could do anything, be anything. Most importantly, I could be myself.” One artist who appreciated Kaliko’s approach was rapper Tech N9ne. The pair met in 1999, through DJ Icy Roc, who once dated Kaliko’s sister. After paying Tech the whopping sum of $500 to feature on his solo album, the Strange Music co-founder discovered Kaliko’s diverse skill set. He asked him to appear on “Who You Came To See,” from his 2001 album, Anghellic, and then they began performing together locally. It lead to a years-long series of collaborations — Kaliko writing, producing, featuring on, touring with and generally being a musical wunderkind in the Strange Music family. “It was like I was his musical muse, and he was mine,” says Kaliko. “We learned from each other. On stage, in the studio— nobody has believed in me, wanted more for me, wanted the entire world to hear and know and understand my talent, more than him.” In 2007, Kaliko officially linked with Strange Music. Since then he’s released five albums, each one more confessional, more expressively oddball than the previous. Songs in his oeuvre include: “Bipolar,” “Misunderstood,” “Freaks,” “Rejections,” and “Scars,” as well as appearing on many others, endearing him to society’s misfits. In recent years, he’s also become more clear-headed about who he is and what he wants to do musically. “For years I rapped and rapped well,” he says. “The fans enjoyed it, I enjoyed it. I made some good music, but it was time to try some new things.” That much is clear from his new album, Go, where he ditches rapping almost completely. Instead he commands listeners to the dance floor, belts out melodies, softly croons, plaintively coos while generally seeming to enjoy himself more than he ever has before. Yes, nearly a decade into his career, Krizz Kaliko is rebranding, rebirthing — or as he’d say, returning to his roots — as a full-fledged singer. Pop, rock, R&B, trap, funk, no genre is off limits, no scale unsung. “I just wanted to make timeless music, songs that could play twenty years from now,” he explains. “Go is a roller coaster ride. It starts out as dance, but then there are other parts where one might listen on a pair of headphones, because it’s very meaningful. Other songs you might turn up in your car. Through it all, I’m speaking from the heart.” The album is chock full of earworms, songs both aesthetically-appeasing, yet also immediately captivating and catchy. Case in point: the brooding “Stop The World;” folky anti-depression ode, “Happy-ish;” or the shout-along “Didn’t Wanna Wake You.” Not completely abandoning hip-hop, songs like “More,” featuring labelmate Stevie Stone, and “Orangutan” — with Strange Music all-stars Tech N9ne, Rittz, Ces Cru, JL, and Wrekonize — invoke the crew’s knowing, trusty Midwestern flavor. Mostly though, Go is a new sound; all frenetic, inspired energy. It’s the biggest, broadest, most accessible project Krizz Kaliko has ever made. “The truth is I’m an unlikely guy to be a pop star,” he says. “Look at me— I’m a big dude, I have vitiligo, I get anxiety attacks, and I’m bipolar. But Top 40 radio and a global audience, that’s what this music is worthy of. I’ve always been an unlikely dude to do anything, whether it’s music, working with Tech N9ne or even being alive. Frankly, the odds being against me, that’s good, I like that. I have trust that the music will ultimately reign supreme.”

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Stevie Stone
(Urban)
For Stevie Stone, the release of Rollin’ Stone, his debut album on Strange Music, signals a move ...
For Stevie Stone, the release of Rollin’ Stone, his debut album on Strange Music, signals a move ...
For Stevie Stone, the release of Rollin’ Stone, his debut album on Strange Music, signals a move beyond his past and his arrival with the premier independent rap company. “The album is all about progression,” he says. “It’s about my shift from Ruthless Records over to Strange Music. Everything about Strange is about getting out and touching the people. Everybody’s in tune with the music and with what I’m doing. I’ve got their undivided attention. They make sure they know and understand their artists.” Stone backs his words up on the explosive, bass-heavy lead single “808 Bendin’,” which features a remarkable verse from Strange Music honcho, Tech N9ne. The two bonded early on regarding their mutual love for the 808 drum machine that was a signature of many classic rap songs created in the 1980s. “I’m 808-driven,” Stone says. “I love that pulse, that backbone. Without pulse, there is no life. That’s what Tech is always saying. I heard the beat for ‘808 Bendin’,’ did the verse and the hook. I thought it was something way, way different for Tech.” Stone keeps the energy at a fever pitch on the confrontational “Raw Talk”, featuring Hopsin and SwizZz, the menacing “Get Buck” and the stark “Keep My Name Out Your Mouth”, featuring Kutt Calhoun. Elsewhere, Stone showcases his storytelling abilities on the tremendous “Dollar General.” Inspired by the 2007 film, Street Thief, Stone flows with a controlled fury about robbing a series of businesses. WillPower’s somber, piano-driven beat and the whispery chorus, delivered by Yelawolf, create a potent, otherworldly, sonic ambiance. “I put it like it was a dream,” Stone explains. “I’m not saying that I’m the one that’s robbing. It’s almost like I’m watching the movie and fall asleep. It’s about my dream.” Music has enabled Stone to live out his dreams and escape his problems. On the soulful “My Remedy,” he details how his problems fade away as soon as he hits the stage. Nonetheless, music has not provided a total escape. The wistful “2 Far” reveals how Stone’s love for music has created tremendous struggle in his relationship with his woman. Then there’s the dramatic “My Life.” On this emotional cut, Stone details the challenges he’s created for himself and his family by pursuing his music career. Although the emotions were raw, the song took Stone nearly two years to write. “I was wrestling with how much I want to give to the people,” he says. “It’s revealing a lot of stuff. I’m talking about my being away from my kids, my family and loved ones. I’d been writing it for a year or two because I had the beat for a minute, but I didn’t know how much I really wanted to put out there. I just let go and let the music take me.” Music has taken Stone on the road. Given his love for touring, it makes Stone a natural fit on Strange Music, as one of the company’s key components is its touring enterprise. Add in Stone’s bond with Tech, his high quality music and his dedication to his craft and it’s no wonder Stone is the latest addition to the Strange Music roster. It’s also why Stone wrote the song “Perfect Stranger.” “My first show ever, when I was in high school, was with Tech. Eleven years later, it comes full circle,” he says. “I’m on the label. It’s something that I’ve always wanted. I think I’m a perfect fit with them.” Born and raised in Columbia, Missouri, Stone has been surrounded by music his entire life. His mother was a singer and choir director who played piano and organ. One of his sisters also sang and played instruments. While his mother favored gospel, blues and the work of Marvin Gaye, Teddy Pendergrass and Luther Vandross, his sisters listened to rap and R&B, providing a wide range of sounds, styles and artistic influences. By the time he was five, music consumed Stone. When a beat would start playing, Stone would be instantly compelled to dance. He later started playing the piano and practicing on the drums. Stone was simultaneously developing his basketball skills. He received an offer to play basketball at a junior college in Des Moines, Iowa, and was going to pursue the opportunity. A few weeks before he was slated to report to school, Stone landed a performance as an opening act at a concert at the Fulton Fairgrounds. “When I hit that stage, I got the bug,” he recalls. “There was no doubt about it. Music was what I was going to do. I’ve never turned back.” Within a few years, Stone secured a production deal in St. Louis with Fly Moves Productions, requiring he relocate from Columbia. Stone jumped at the opportunity. “You should never be content with where you’re at,” he says. “I’ve got the shoot-for-the-moon-end-up-in-the-stars type of attitude.” Stone signed in 2007 with Ruthless Records, the label founded by the late gangster rap pioneer Eazy-E and the recording home of N.W.A. While signed to the imprint, he learned the work ethic needed in order to succeed in the music industry. He realized that an artist has to do as much as possible for themselves and not rely on a label. So, when Stone parted ways with Ruthless a few years later, he was poised for success. He reconnected with Tech N9ne and Strange Music, which had developed into rap’s biggest independent success story. Now, with Rollin’ Stone about to arrive in stores, Stevie Stone realizes that his climb to success isn’t over. “After every ladder, there’s another ladder. You’ve got to keep climbing the ladder, keep moving. That’s what I’m doing right now.”

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Ces Cru
(Urban)
There were times when more hip-hop albums sounded like this, like Ces Cru’s Constant Energy Struggles, the Kansas City duo’s debut full-length album on Strange Records. There were times when albums were formulated around concepts big and small, dedicated to pushing envelopes, sharing pin-pointed messages and built around lyrical conceits that required intense listening, confident rhyme flows that created new patterns, music that thumped and bumped and pounded and grooved. Those times are not now, but Constant Energy Struggles arrives in this moment—sounding not like an anachronism or a revival, but a celebration of a lineage that, while overshadowed by other aspects of hip-hop, has continued to evolve and progress ...
There were times when more hip-hop albums sounded like this, like Ces Cru’s Constant Energy Struggles, the Kansas City duo’s debut full-length album on Strange Records. There were times when albums were formulated around concepts big and small, dedicated to pushing envelopes, sharing pin-pointed messages and built around lyrical conceits that required intense listening, confident rhyme flows that created new patterns, music that thumped and bumped and pounded and grooved. Those times are not now, but Constant Energy Struggles arrives in this moment—sounding not like an anachronism or a revival, but a celebration of a lineage that, while overshadowed by other aspects of hip-hop, has continued to evolve and progress ...
There were times when more hip-hop albums sounded like this, like Ces Cru’s Constant Energy Struggles, the Kansas City duo’s debut full-length album on Strange Records. There were times when albums were formulated around concepts big and small, dedicated to pushing envelopes, sharing pin-pointed messages and built around lyrical conceits that required intense listening, confident rhyme flows that created new patterns, music that thumped and bumped and pounded and grooved. Those times are not now, but Constant Energy Struggles arrives in this moment—sounding not like an anachronism or a revival, but a celebration of a lineage that, while overshadowed by other aspects of hip-hop, has continued to evolve and progress outside of the mainstream. It’s only fitting that Ces Cru—comprised of rappers Godemis and Ubiquitous—would release Constant Energy Struggles. For the past dozen years, the two have operated mostly as a duo, all that remained of the much larger Ces Cru. “Ces Cru was a collective of like-minded individuals,” says Godemis, a founding member of the group since high school. When he first began rhyming, he was simply doing cover versions of albums like Mac Mall’s Illegal Business? “The thing at the time was to be able to learn the rhyme and not only know the lyrics, but to be able to spit them at the same capacity as the record. It was like having a guitar and learning a solo.” One day, during his sophomore year, while he was reciting some Boot Camp Clik verses, a classmate who was already rhyming, gave him some backhanded encouragement: Oh that’s cool, but you should write your own shit. “He said it like he was the shit because he was writing his own stuff and I wasn’t,” Godemis recalls. Not long after, a friend approached Godemis with headphones and let him hear a verse he had recorded over Das Efx’s “Microphone Master.” That night Godemis wrote his first rhyme. Soon enough, Ces Cru began to take root.“We made a lot of music without any clear direction,” says Godemis, adding that Ces Cru became infamous for shutting down ciphers and studio sessions about town. “We just tore up the streets in Kansas City together. It went from being more like a gang to a group as things progressed, as we started booking shows and actually making albums and putting time and effort and money into the music. We just thought that one day we could possibly eat off this rap life and we enjoyed out-rapping motherfuckers.”When Ubiquitous—a Colorado native who grew up on acts like Kool Moe Dee, LL Cool J and the Fat Boys as well as metal, punk rock, ska and electronica—moved to Kansas City in 2000, he had already been polishing his rap skills over jungle beats. “I used to rhyme at raves,” he admits. “I guess that’s why I like fast-paced rapping and making really progressive rhymes, stylistically speaking and content-wise.” Though Ces Cru had swelled to include six full-time rappers and had declared membership closed, Godemis was impressed by Ubi’s skills during a recording session and invited him to join the group. As time went on, members moved, moved on, went to jail–leaving just Godemis and Ubiquitous. “These days, it’s just him and I: Aquemini,” jokes Ubi. “We discussed the prospect of admitting other people into the crew, and even really strongly thought about it multiple times. But when it got down to the wire, we were like Nah, it just needs to be me and you. We’re probably done adding members for life and we’re just out here mobbing together.” Together, the duo independently released 2004’s Capture Enemy Soldiers (featuring appearances from former member Sorceress) and The Playground in 2009—both heartfelt, intricate works of beats, rhymes and life that play with music, words and ideas with astounding ease. Since signing with Strange Music at the end of 2011, the duo has released a pair of solo mixtapes—Godemis’ The Deevil and Ubiquitous’ Matter Don’t Money—as well as an EP, 13. Their new release, Constant Energy Struggles, takes everything that has come before it and advances theargument for hip-hop as a wordsmith's affair.Inspired by conspiracy theories, metaphysics and everyday labor pains, Constant Energy Struggles contains lyrical exercises like the Tech N9ne-featured “Juice,” a masterful homage to Rakim’s classic “Juice (Know the Ledge)” and the four-bar patty cake “When Worlds Collide” which finds Godemis being “too fly” before crash-landing and “looking for the black box, FBI search methods/Soul of Saddam, I’m the motherfuckin’ bomb/ Check it: inspiration of Hitler/ Bruce Lee’s work ethic” before Ubiquitous picks up with “Sun Tzu, manifest a Dalai Lama mindstate/Hijack a G6, trippin’ tryna fly straight.” Produced by longtime collaborators Info Gates and Leonard Dstroy as well as Strange music’s go-to beatmaster, Michael “Seven” Summers and others, Constant Energy Struggles is a well-rounded affair, both musically and topically. The slow blues-rock of “Smoke” and the slight psychedelia of “Confession” address the issues of balance, strife and love within romantic relationships. “Wall E” speaks on the destruction of the Earth: “People pretend like the shit they using just disappears/As if it doesn’t accumulate every fiscal year/ Shit don’t evaporate, vanish without a trace/ There’s a island made of trash, you can spot it from outer space,” raps Godemis.Closer to home are tracks like the rejoiceful “Shake It Up,” the introspective “Perception” and the menacing “Fuck Me on the Dough”—songs which deal with the ups and downs of blossoming fame: the delight of success, the expectations of fans, the shadiness of promoters. “Constant Energy Struggles comes from real life experiences,” confesses Ubiquitous. “Everything I’m talking about is stuff that actually happened to me in the past or recently.” Nowhere is this more apparent than in the opening number, “Lotus” where Godemis notes that they “came a hell of a way from battling squads, murdering features” and admits that “they might’ve been local forever had Tech not swooped them.” But Tech N9ne did swoop them. And Constant Energy Struggles signals that Ces Cru is just beginning.

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State Of Krisis
(Urban)
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  Working heavily over the past few years opening for the likes of T-Pain, Ying Yang Twinz, Tech 9, Whitney Peyton, Spice 1, and Andre Nickatina, S.O.K. has been spreading their blue collar hip hop, creating enough buzz to secure a meeting with Def Jam Records this last year. In July of 2016, State of Krisis completed  their second headlining tour spanning 10 cities in 11 days. High energy, thought provoking, 90s flavor hip hop are words to describe State Of Krisis. With their second studio release "Chaos Theory", State Of Krisis returns to the scene with a force of lyrical prowess and a variety of songs to appeal to any crowd. Known for their live performance, SOK has steadily grown into one of the premier hip hop acts from Washington state. With plans to hit the Festival Circut in 2017, SOK will soon stand toe to toe with today's top hip hop artists. Enjoy the ride. Welcome to the State Of Krisis. 

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