address
address

KNITTING FACTORY ENTERTAINMENT

[POSTPONED] Tech N9ne - Enterfear Tour 2020

Events

Apr 26 Sun
[POSTPONED] Tech N9ne - Enterfear Tour 20207:30 PM | Doors: 6:30 PM
Knitting Factory Concert House - Spokane
Spokane, WA
All Ages
This event has been postponed. Please hang on to your tickets as they will be valid on the new date. 

TOUR UPDATE FROM STRANGE MUSIC:
We’ve been getting a ton of emails and phone calls from people wondering what the status of Tech N9ne’s ENTERFEAR Tour 2020 is and we wanted to take the time to provide you with an update on where we currently stand.

Due to the recent and ongoing developments concerning the situation with COVID-19 (Coronavirus), we have no other option but to inform everyone that we absolutely have to postpone this tour. After extensive deliberation, taking into consideration the safety, health and well-being of you, our extended family, as well as that of our artists, crew and all the venue staff that it takes to put on a tour, we have decided that it’s in the best interest of everyone to make this adjustment. We realize that this is disappointing to many of you, as well as us, but we know it’s a necessary step to ensure we do what we can to protect everyone involved.

Trust us when we say this was not a decision we wanted to make, but one that we feel is necessary and responsible, as we look around us, both within our industry and beyond, and see the effect this virus is having on a national and global scale. We support all of the other acts who have had to make similar decisions in the recent weeks, as we know there were no other options.

We are currently working with promoters and venues to reschedule this tour, as we speak (keep in mind, this is no small task). We have no intention of canceling this tour, but we do have to postpone it for now. We will keep you updated along the way, but know that our plan is to go to every city that’s currently listed on the tour routing. The promoters and venues have confirmed that all tickets that have been purchased will be honored on their respective rescheduled date. Additionally, we will honor all meet and greets that were purchased with VIP packages when the dates are rescheduled.

In the event that we have to change any venues or promoters, due to availability issues in the process of rescheduling, we will be providing detailed information, should this occur. In these cases, should you have previously purchased tickets or VIP packages, prior to the venue or promoter change, you will receive additional instructions so you’ll be fully informed.

We wish everyone the best during this difficult time. Please continue to be diligent in your efforts to remain healthy. We appreciate your support and understanding and look forward to seeing you soon.

TECH N9NE

For an artist who has achieved so much – the most robust touring regimen in rap, more than a decade owning the most successful independent rap label, an independently released gold single, and recurring placement on Forbes’ Hip-Hop Cash Kings list, among them – Tech N9ne wanted his new album to transport him and his listeners to new levels of musical expression. With Special Effects, the Strange Music mogul has delivered.

“We’re playing with music, letting people know that we got this,” Tech N9ne says. “What it turned into, after my mom passed June 6, 2014, we still kept the same thing of affecting the music and the beats, but it got real serious, man.”

Tech N9ne gets serious in each section of Special Effects, which is broken into 10 portions (each of which has its own subdivision), starting with “Sunday Morning” and running through the entire week before concluding with another “Sunday” installment and an “Encore.”

The “Wednesday” section is dedicated to lyricism and features a collaboration Tech N9ne’s been working on since 1999. Eminem appears with Tech N9ne and Krizz Kaliko on “Speedom (WWC2),” one of the best rap exercises ever recorded. Each rapper flows at breakneck speed while clearly articulating each word of their mind-blowing raps.

Even though having Eminem on Special Effects may bring Tech N9ne extra attention, he didn’t secure the appearance for name recognition. “I got Eminem on the album because I love what he does and he’s on the top of his game,” Tech N9ne explains. “I always felt like I was one of those guys, too, that really took time with lyrics, that really took time to create material that people have to study.”

Longtime Tech N9ne fans have been studying Tech N9ne’s story raps for years. One of his most legendary series reaches its dramatic finale with “Pyscho B**ch III.” Given that the Kansas City rapper no longer has the psycho female element in his life, he wanted to conclude the installments with a chilling ending based on a real-life experience.  

“When I heard the beat, it was so massive and so eerie that I wanted to talk about a crime of passion,” Tech N9ne explains of the song, which features Hopsin. “My best friend Brian Dennis, he was killed through a crime of passion, so I know it’s about a woman dating two dudes, usually. So, I made the song with two rappers dating the same chick. She got busted with one of them and they both knew each other. They don’t like each other much and they’re fighting over this girl.”

Switching gears, Tech N9ne gets serious about making music for the clubs with “Hood Go Crazy.” The song features 2 Chainz and B.o.B, and harkens back to Tech N9ne’s roots as a dancer.

“I know what makes people move,” he explains. “Just like I did ‘Planet Rock 2K,’ ‘Let’s Get Fucked Up’ and a lot of the party songs I’ve done, being three-dimensional. It’s 2015 now, so what’s Tech N9ne’s ‘Caribou Lou’ going to sound like in the future? It’s ‘Hood Go Crazy.’”

As much as Tech N9ne focuses on other pursuits, Special Effects is dominated by darkness, the pain and confusion that enveloped him upon the death of his mother. While he was reflecting upon her passing, he thought about the artwork of his K.O.D., Seepage and Boiling Point projects. Each featured black tar covering a portion of Tech N9ne’s body. As Tech N9ne revisited his artwork, he and producer Seven realized he was now metaphorically covered by this film.

The results were “Shroud,” one of Special Effects’ most emotional songs. “It has a need to be angelic, to be good, to take all that madness and let it explode and shake the masses and put it back on the evil people,” Tech N9ne explains. “I spit out everything I felt. I was really angry with people’s evilness and was dealing with my confusion about my mom, about why she was so tormented. She was such a God-fearing person, loving person. It’s just me talking to God and really letting the darkness take over me, but still turn it on the evil. It’s all in me, but then I turn it back on them, the evil that they made.”

As the album heads into its final sections, Tech explains how people have turned on him with “A Certain Comfort,” discusses losing longtime friends to disagreements on “Burn It Down” and details bringing people together on “Life Sentence.” With “Dyin’ Flyin’,” he addresses people’s claims that he’s selling out, while “Worldly Angel” sums Tech N9ne up as a human: the good and the bad, the confusion and the joy.  

These are hallmarks of Tech N9ne’s work, key ingredients that have helped the Missouri mastermind grow from one of rap’s best-kept secrets into one of its most successful acts. With a tireless work ethic, he became rap’s marquee double-threat: a rapper whose musical magnificence was matched by his impeccable live show. He and partner Travis O’Guin launched Strange Music in 1999 and have methodically built it into an independent powerhouse, a label that releases high-quality, chart-topping music and whose artists, Tech N9ne chief among them, tour throughout the world virtually year-round.

It all adds up to one of rap’s best success stories. But, as Tech N9ne has found, success doesn’t always shield you from loss, setbacks and jealousy. “It’s messed up that money changes everybody around you and not necessarily you,” Tech N9ne says. “I’m still me. Money changes everything. Fame changes everything and it’s a shame. That’s one thing about Special Effects. Two is that I’m totally messed up about my mom’s death because I felt like she was such an angel and she was cheated spiritually, to me, in this life, so I’m frustrated. But in the midst of all that sadness and upset and madness, I’m still going to find a way to celebrate, to say thank you to my fans. We’re going to party the pain away.”

And Special Effects is the perfect elixir – for Tech N9ne and for the rest of us. 

READ MORE +

Jelly Roll

Checking in at six feet one inches and over 350 pounds, not to mention covered in tattoos, it’s impossible to ignore Jason “Jelly Roll” DeFord in a room. And that’s before his booming country-twanged voice enters the conversation. “I’m just a regular fat piece of white trash with some real people that relate,” he loudly explains with a wide grin, sending everyone else within earshot into riotous laughter. For the 27-year-old Jelly, a nickname he picked up from his mother and kept to honor an incarcerated friend, humor has always been a way to cope with the struggle he would go through in life. Growing up in the rougher areas of Nashville, TN, particularly the Southside city known as Antioch, Jelly got an early taste for street life and fast cash. “I’ve always joked that Antioch is the cultural melting pot the government uses to test how different ethnicities live together in a lower and middle class area,” He laughs referring to the city’s racially diverse, albeit economically bleak make up.Captivated by the gritty rhymes of local legends such as Pistol, Quanie Cash, Haystak, and Kool Daddy Fresh, it wasn’t long before the music would mirror Jelly Roll’s personal life. Catching his first case at age 14, Jelly would endure an ongoing cycle of incarceration until 2009 which would include intent to distribute cocaine charges and multiple probation violations.Continuing to soak up the sounds from southern artists such as UGK, 8ball & MJG, Three 6 Mafia, Chamillionare and Paul Wall, it was during these particularly dark times that Jelly would turn to crafting his own rhymes as a therapeutic means to deal with his trials and tribulations: “My music is all based on emotions and stories from my life as well as people around me. I want to convey to people the power of faith and perseverance and I hope that it helps them to find a light in whatever darkness they may be going through in there life.” In the summer of 2010, Jelly Roll’s “Pop Another Pill” collaboration with Memphis luminary Lil Wyte would go on to garner over 1 million YouTube views. This viral sensation lead to the SNO group album Year-Round released on Hypnotized Minds in April 2011, a project executive-produced by Oscar winners DJ Paul and Juicy J. Jelly continued his successful 2011 campaign by releasing Gambling On A Whiteboy 4 during the summer and combining his talents with Haystak for the successful Strictly Business joint-album in November. His unique combination of introspection, melody, and punchlines has struck a chord with an ever-growing nationwide fan base and continues to impress. In between new projects, Jelly still finds time to volunteer at and provide financial backing for the local SuCO Boxing & MMA gym to help provide disadvantaged youth with a place to take part in positive activities. “My ultimate goal is to touch and reach people and have a voice of influence with the youth of today, he reveals. “I know that sounds like the opposite of what I’m aiming for by the content of some of my bigger songs, but the real purpose will shine through in the end. Helping people and life in general is a marathon, not a 40-yard-dash.” Spoken like someone who has truly been through the fire, its evident Jelly Roll is on a path to even greater acclaim- and that means a greater change for the world

READ MORE +