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KNITTING FACTORY ENTERTAINMENT

THEORY, 10 Years, Eva Under Fire

Events

Dec 17 Fri
THEORY, 10 Years, Eva Under Fire8:00 PM | Doors: 7:00 PM
Knitting Factory Concert House - Spokane
Spokane, WA
All Ages
Buy Tickets $25.00 - $35.00
The Theory concert on December 17th at Knitting Factory requires proof of full vaccination or a negative COVID test within 72 hours of the event for entry. All patrons need to provide this information as a condition of entry.

Masks are required for all shows per the State Mandate.

THEORY

You know what they say, "When the going gets tough, the tough get going.”

In Theory of a Deadman's case, they go right to the studio. In the middle of 2013, the platinum-selling Canadian quartet began working on what would become its fifth full-length album, Savages [Roadrunner Records/604]. However, everything in their lives rapidly and unexpectedly changed. Whether it be a shakeup at their label, waning interest in rock at radio, or the downturn of society at large, a myriad of issues weighed heavy on members Tyler Connolly [Lead Vocals, Lead Guitar], David Brenner [Rhythm Guitar], Dean Back [Bass], and Joey Dandeneau [Drums].

So, Connolly channeled it all into his songwriting.

"It's such a different record for us," he asserts. "I'm known as the guy who writes all of the 'breakup' songs. It would have been typical to write more, so I did just the opposite. There's something very brutal about our culture. I got nightmares from Terminator as a kid and, now, you can watch real murders on YouTube. We're so desensitized. I went from writing about crazy women to how screwed up we are. That's the theme. I'd spend twenty hours a day at my home studio. I became a weird recluse, and I even grew a beard. I dug in deeper than ever for these songs. I just said, 'Fuck it' and went for it."

Once again teaming with super producer Howard Benson [My Chemical Romance, Halestorm] in the studio, he tapped into the same robust riffing and primal power that coursed through the group's 2008 platinum-certified breakthrough, Scars & Souvenirs—which yielded the #1 Mainstream Rock Radio smash "Bad Girlfriend" as well as "So Happy" and "By The Way". Lyrically, Connolly turned his attention to the state of the world around him and churned out the band's catchiest and most crushing statement yet.

"This is Theory of a Deadman on steroids but not with the shrunken balls and b-acne side effects," he assures. "It's always been with us. This nodded back to our early material but with more musicality. I got to write about something other than relationships too, and I was excited to tackle new material. People seem surprised when they actually listen, but what were you expecting a fucking OneRepublic record?"

The band don't apologize for anything. The first single "Drown" ebbs and flows between a staggering wall of distortion and an infectious chorus from Connolly. The tide comes in with one of the group's biggest anthems.

"I tried to get up every morning and write a song, and that lasted three days before I quit," he chuckles. "I wrote 'Drown' during the second day. It's about being alone and finding contentment within that. It's a metaphor. No one cares if you drown or not. It's based on how I felt at the time."

Meanwhile, the title track functions as the album's clarion call, and it enlists a chilling spoken word and hypnotic harmony from none other than the legendary Alice Cooper. "I had never met him before," recalls Connolly. "I got to fly to his house in Phoenix and work on the song. He's a super nice guy. I stole the spoken word idea from Vincent Price in Thriller. Alice killed it. I was so happy to work with him."

The album does uphold a tradition for Theory of a Deadman, bringing another ballad to the fold, though it's not a "breakup song" per se. This time, "Angel" swings from a bright guitar into a heavenly refrain about a different kind of love.

"I thought about being in love with an angel and how bad of an idea that actually is," he explains. "Once you fall back to earth, you realize you have nothing in common, and you have to let her go."

"Blow" treads the tongue-in-cheek terrain that the band excel at. Connolly even slyly sings, "Sometimes, it makes me want to blow my fucking head off" with a swaying swing.

At the same time, they also stomp into new territory altogether with their first-ever proper "country" track. For "Livin' My Life Like a Country Song", the boys enlisted the guitar and vocal talents of Rascal Flatts' Joe Don Rooney. As a result, they collectively tell a rollicking and raucous little tale worthy of Nashville.

"We've always had a bit of Southern rock swagger," he goes on. "In this case, Joe Don Rooney countrified it, and it turned out great. We wanted to give our take on how all of these country songs are about losing your woman and your house. All you've got left is a case of beer, your dog, and your trailer. She's gone, and you're living your life like a country song!"

That songwriting prowess solidified Theory of a Deadman as a major contender in modern rock since their self-titled 2002 debut. Most recently, 2011's The Truth Is… landed in the Top 10 of Billboard's Top 200 Albums Chart upon its debut, while topping the "Top Rock Albums", "Top Alternative Albums", and "Top Hard Rock Albums" charts. In addition, it spawned the #1 radio hit "Lowlife", which ruled Rock Radio for three weeks straight. Along the way, the group has toured with everybody from Alter Bridge, Stone Sour, and Godsmack to Daughtry and Mötley Crüe. However, Connolly and the guys always have the same goal in mind.

"We want to give fans a great Theory of a Deadman record," Connolly leaves off. "We owed them this album. It's completely real, unrestrained, and unbridled. We want their acceptance above all. This is for them, and we're all extremely proud of it."

Savages is as tough as rock 'n' roll gets.

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10 Years

Jesse Hasek – Vocals
Brian Vodinh – Guitar
Matt Wantland –  Guitar

Chad Huff – Bass
Kyle Mayer – Drums

Sometimes when band members reunite, it’s as if no time has passed and nothing has changed. That couldn’t be further from the truth for 10 Years. And, that’s a good thing. When guitarist/drummer Brian Vodinh and guitarist Matt Wantland returned to the Knoxville, Tennessee alt-metal/post-grunge band for their eighth album and Mascot Records debut, (how to live) AS GHOSTS, they burst through their comfort zones to create something new. Something better. Something career-defining.

 “It’s funny, I named our last record, [2015’s] From Birth to Burial, because I thought it was our final record because it just didn’t feel like 10 Years without Brian and Matt. But having them back is really a reunion of the core writing team and this new record actually feels like a real rebirth for the band,” says singer Jesse Hasek.

While Vodinh handled drums and guitar on the new album, he’s switching to just guitar for the live shows, moving Chad Huff from guitar to bass, while Kyle Mayer stays on drums. “We’re bringing it back the way they should be,” says Vodinh, who left the band due to family commitments in 2013. “It feels great to be back with these guys and we’re in such a better place musically and creatively than ever before.”

That better place stems, in part, from a more collaborative writing process. “It used to be that just Jesse and I would write the full song, and the other guys would add a little spice to it. This time, we’re starting the writing process as a full band. Sometimes it starts with a riff. Sometimes it starts with a vocal. Our formula is no formula, and it kind of works. And, we work together in a more constructive and healthier environment now,” explains Vodinh.

The sixth collaborator was Grammy award-winning producer Nick Raskulinecz (Alice in Chains, Foo Fighters, Deftones). “Nick made us step outside our comfort zone,” explains Hasek. “It made for a different sounding record. The one thing we never wanted to do is recreate the same thing over and over. We have always been musicians that love to explore and venture into new horizons.”

It wasn’t easy, the band admits. “Nick threw us curve-balls and challenged us to re-write stuff and do things we normally wouldn’t have done. He helped us cut away the fat and really get to the meat and potatoes of each song. He pushed us and was challenging at times, but it helped us grow.”

The result is 10 Years’ most dynamic and multi-dimensional record to date. Raskulinecz encouraged the band to strip away some of the vocal production they’ve grown accustomed to in order to reveal a more intimate side of Hasek. “Historically, we like to orchestrate a lot of vocal parts. We’ll have harmonies and layers. This time around, Nick had us strip a lot of that away. There are a lot of moments where the only vocal is just Jesse, and not this big freaking epic thing. It makes Jesse more human. And I think the more human Jesse comes across, the more relatable his lyrics are,” says Vodinh.

Raskulinecz also helped Hasek be more straightforward in his lyrics and message. “In the past, I’ve written a lot of songs that were pretty ambiguous. But on this record, I’m more comfortable being direct and talking about things that are important to me. I’m older and find myself reflecting on the world more especially after having traveled the world and talk to people and really see what’s going on,” says Hasek.

The title track, (how to live) AS GHOSTS, is one such song. “After traveling the world and seeing all the political, social, and religious turmoil, it had me thinking about how many people are judging and preparing for death, but are actually missing life. And, instead of using spirituality for good, a lot of people use it to point fingers and judge. Instead of worrying where we end up in the end, we need to focus on the now and the humanity.”

“Burnout” is another observation on mankind. “It’s about a person that’s right there in the limelight, has every opportunity to see the greatest things in life that are right in front of them, but they are too inside themselves to see it,” says Hasek.

“Blood Red Sky” was originally from a solo EP Vodinh had recorded. “The song grabbed my ear the first time I heard it because it had such a different vibe,” says Hasek, “but I had a different vocal idea for it so we changed it up. It’s about the struggle of maintaining everyday life and how fast your existence just flashes before your eyes. But, it also says that we are surviving and will make it through — that we will always fight through.”

On the first single, “Novacaine,” Hasek looks inward. “Six albums and a hundred songs in, I wondered if I’ve already written my best stuff,” he admits. “But at some point, you start to get real adult problems. Life has such a numbing to it. You see people go from such optimism in their 20s to having life just beat them down later. I think we all kind of get desensitized and numb to life on some level. That’s what this song is about.”

10 Years has come a long way since their inception in 1999. The band landed a deal with Universal/Republic Records on the strength of their two independent releases, 2001’s Into the Half Moon and 2004’s Killing All That Holds You. Their major label debut, 2005’s The Autumn Effect, debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Heatseekers Album chart thanks to their breakthrough hit, “Wasteland,” which topped Billboard’s Modern Rock Tracks chart, and “Through the Iris,” which hit No. 20 on Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks.

The band followed that success with 2008’s Division, featuring co-production work from Rick Parashar (Alice In Chains, Pearl Jam). The album peaked at No. 12 on The Billboard 200 and spawned the hit “Beautiful,” which reached No. 6 on the Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks. The momentum continued with 2010’s Feeding the Wolves, which was produced by Howard Benson (My Chemical Romance, 3 Doors Down) and bowed at No. 17 on The Billboard 200, while the single, “Shoot It Out,” peaked at No. 6 on Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks and spent 25 weeks on the chart.

The group, which toured the world with such rock greats at Linkin Park, Korn, and Deftones, went back to their indie roots with 2012’s Minus the Machine on their own Palehorse Records, which was part of Warner Music Label Group. The album debuted at No. 2 on the Hard Rock Albums chart, No. 8 on the Top Rock Albums chart, and No. 26 on The Billboard 200.

“We self-produced our last few records, so it was good to give the reigns over to someone else for the first time in awhile. We had to really let go and trust and I think in doing that, it opened us to new ideas and helped us stretch creatively,” says Hasek.

(how to live) AS GHOSTS might be the band’s 8th album. But, to them, it feels like a new start. “There was a heavier, darker tone to our last record because we weren’t in a good place,” adds the singer. “Ghosts has a brighter side to it because we’re all in a really happy, optimistic, and excited place about music and life. We’re ready to see how the world embraces it.”

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